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Primate Conservation

 
Coordinators:  Dean Anderson and Nancy Ruggeri, Department of Zoology,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
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The World's Top 25 Most Endangered Primates- 2002

A recent report released by Conservation International (CI) and the Primate Specialist
Group of IUCN was finalized at the 2002 International Primatological Society meetings
in Beijing. It is a revision of their previously released "The World's Top 25 most Endangered Primates",
which indicates that about one out of every three primate species is currently
threatened with extinction.  This updated version suggests that Indonesia now exceeds
Madagascar and Brazil for the country with the most endangered primates.  However,
Madagascar, identified as one of the world's biodiversity hotspots, has 10 critically endangered
species, and 21 endangered species.  For the full report, please refer to the link at the bottom
of this message.


Each week, we will be featuring one of the 25 primate species in peril.  This is being
done in conjunction with Conservation International.  The fact sheets are compiled by
Sean Flannery at the WPRC Library and Information Service.


Roloway Guenon and White-naped Mangabey
Cercopithecus diana roloway and Cercocebus atys lunulatus
Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire
Côte d'Ivoire


Photo Link: http://www.primate.wisc.edu/pin/ci/ci08.html
http://www.primate.wisc.edu/pin/ci/ci09.html
There are two subspecies of Cercopithecus diana, both highly attractive, arboreal monkeys that inhabit the Upper Guinean forests of West Africa. The Roloway subspecies is distinguished by its broad white brow line, long white beard and yellow thighs. Of the two forms, the Roloway, which is known from Ghana and eastern Côte d'Ivoire, is more seriously threatened with extinction. The white-naped mangabey (Cercocebus atys lunulatus) seemed relatively common during the 1950s and was considered a crop pest at that time. However, surveys and systematic censuses carried out in the 1990s indicate that this subspecies is now very rare, being a target species of the relentless bushmeat trade, along with the Roloway guenon. Surveys conducted in the latter half of last year by Lindsay Magnuson (Humboldt State University) confirmed the presence of both species in Ghana's Ankasa Resource Reserve, Dadieso Forest Reserve, Krokosua Hills Forest Reserve and Yoyo Forest Reserve. Their occurrence in several other forests was also considered possible based on interviews in local communities, but it is just as likely that they have been extirpated from a number of protected areas in which they formerly were recorded, including Bia National Park. The Roloway guenon is not known from any protected areas in Côte d'Ivoire, whereas the white-naped mangabey has been reported from Marahoue National Park.

Relevant Citations:

McGraw WS. Three monkeys nearing extinction in the forest reserves of eastern Cote d'Ivoire. ORYX 32 (3): 233-236 JUL 1998

Fact Sheet:


The full report is available at:
Full report
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Topics in Primate Conservation is supported by a grant RR00167,
Regional Primate Centers Program, National Center for Research
Resources, The National Institutes of Health.
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Posted Date: 2-11-03