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Harvard University
Department of Human Evolutionary Biology
(Established 1886)
Educational Program
Web Site: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k5526&tabgroupid=icb.tabgroup13168

Director: Professor Daniel Lieberman
Phone: 1 (617) 495-2246 (department tele)   Fax: 1 (617) 496-8041   E-Mail: mlynch@fas.harvard.edu
11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 UNITED STATES
Department: Department of Human Evolutionary Biology
Institution: Harvard University
Affiliations: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

Mission: The objective of the graduate program in human evolutionary biology is to provide the candidate for the Ph.D. with comprehensive graduate training in human evolutionary biology and biological anthropology, as well as specialization in a particular research area.

Principal Research Programs: Primate behavior & ecology, evolutionary biology; human biology, reproductive physiology; hominoid genetic evolution, primate phylogeny; primate evolution and paleoecology; functional and developmental morphology, craniofacial anatomy, human evolution

Training Opportunities: Harvard College undergraduates can concentrate in Human Evolutionary Biology or Biological Anthropology for the bachelor's degree. The objective of Harvard's graduate program in Human Evolutionary Biology is to provide the candidate for the Ph.D. with comprehensive training in human evolutionary biology and biological anthropology, as well as specialization in a particular research area. Since one of the principal objectives of our advanced training is preparation for college teaching, for which the doctoral degree is generally required, the master's degree is normally not taken as an end in itself.

Financial Aid: Students admitted to Harvard's doctoral program in human evolutionary biology receive full tuition and ten months of living support for the first four years and a fifth year of dissertation completion support; in the first two years they receive stipends, in the third and fourth years teaching or research fellowships, and a final year of support for dissertation completion. Two-month summer research awards are available for the summers following the first and second years. Awards are reviewed annually and are contingent upon students making satisfactory progress in the program. Prospective applicants are urged to apply for outside fellowships that offer tuition and stipend support during graduate school. These include the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships, the Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, and the U.S. Department of Education's Jacob K. Javits Fellowships. Application deadlines for these fellowships are in the fall, well before Harvard's admissions deadline. Eligible applicants are encouraged to investigate these funding opportunities early in the application season.

Number of Staff: 10

Associated Field Sites: Kibale Chimpanzee Project, Kibale Forest, Uganda, directed by Professor Richard Wrangham. In addition, Professor Marc Hauser of Harvard's Department of Psychology directs a research site in Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico; and Professor Charles Nunn directs field research in various sites. Fieldwork is integrated with/complemented by research in Harvard's Nutritional Ecology Lab (Wrangham/Conklin-Brittain), Reproductive Ecology Lab (Ellison/Lipson/Knott), Paleoanthropology Lab (Pilbeam/Barry), Molecular Anthropology Analysis Lab (Ruvolo), Skeletal Biology Lab (Lieberman) and Cognitive Evolution Lab (Hauser).

Supported Species: Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee)

Comments: Graduate Program Administrator Marianne Fritz, tele 617-495-5564, e-mail: amoroso@fas.harvard.edu, for information on graduate program.

Last Updated: 2009-05-23


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