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University Level Course Syllabi

PRIMATE BEHAVIOR (Anthro. 6557 & 4552--Upper Level)
Sue Boinski, University of Florida

PRIMATE BEHAVIOR (Anthro. 6557 & 4552--Upper Level)

        	Course instructor:
        	Sue Boinski
        	University of Florida
        	Department of Anthropology
        	1350 Turlington
        	Gainesville, FL 32611
        	USA
        	Email: boinski@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu
        	Tel: 1-904-392-4780
        
        BACKGROUND:
        
        In the four years this course has been taught, the class maximun
        number of students has been 15. It is composed of half graduate
        students (Anthropology, Zoology, Psychology and Physiology) who
        need an introduction to primate behavioral ecology. The other half
        are usually graduating seniors in Anthroplogy and Zoology who
        have good training in their majors and have completed all class
        required courses.
        
        CLASS SYLLABUS 
        Anthropology 6557 & 4552 
        
        Spring 1995 
        Tuesday mornings, periods 2-4, 8:30-11:30 am 
        Classroom: 1321 Turlington 
        
        Office Hours: Monday and Thursday alternoons 3-4:30 pm and by
        appointment in Turlington B366 
        
        Texts: 
        a) Smuts, B.B., et al., eds. 1987. Primate Societies. University of 
        Chicago Press. abbreviation: P S . 
        
        b) Krebs, J. R. & N. B. Davies, eds. 1991. Behavioral Ecology: an 
        Evolutionary Approach. Blackwell Scientific Publs. 3rd 
        Edition. abbreviation: B E . 
        
        c) Other readings will be placed on reserve in the Science Library and
        can also be checked out from the Anthropology Department office in 
        1350 Turlington. Most of these readings can also be found in journals
        in the Science Library or Library West. 
        
        
        Course work: 
        1. Class discussion is essential -- better to ask questions than to be
        silent. 
        
        2. It is strongly advised that the assigned material be read in advance
        of each class meeting. Final grades will reflect class preparation and 
        participation.
        
        3. Behavior study project: 4-5 typewritten pages, including tables.
        Details will be explained in class. Group projects are encouraged. 
        
        4. Term paper relating to primate behavior. At least 20 pages of text
        are required. No more than five lines of text can be direct quotes. An
        outline of the paper I will comment on drafts of term is required about
        half-way though the semester. papers if they are given to me by 1 April
        1995. 
        
        5. Two informal 5-10 minute presentations on assigned topics and a
        formal 12-minute presentation based on the term paper. 
        
        6. One quiz on terms and concepts essential to an understanding of
        primate behavior.
        
        7. Graduate and undergraduate students will complete identical
        assignments but will be graded separately. 
        
        
        Class Schedule and Required Readings. Note that additional readings 
        may be assigned and other changes made at the whim of the instructor.
        
        
        January 10: 
        a. Class organization and introduction 
        b. Two slide shows: primate taxonomy and primate social organization
        c. Start (if time permits) of lecture: Review of primate taxonomy and
        basic concepts in primate behavior. 
        
        Assignments: 
        i) Each student will prepare a brief presentation (no more 
        than 5 min in duration) on the highlights and nifty features of a 
        primate taxonomic group that will be assigned. 
        
        ii) Start browsing texts and books on reserve in library for potential
        term paper topics. Identify what parts of the course material 
        you might or might be familiar with already. Do not let the B E 
        text intimidate you. 
        
        January 17 
        a. Quick trip through a third slide show on primate conservation 
        b. Continuation of lecture on basic concepts of primatology 
        c. 5 min reports from students on primate taxa 
        
        January 24 
        Discussion of the following chapters: 
        a. Kinship, PS, pp.299-305 
        b. Conflict and Cooperation, PS, pp.306-3 17 
        c. Parental Investment, BE, pp.234-262 
        
        We will also discuss topics for term papers. Come to class with
        well-pondered ideas. 
        
        
        January 31 
        
        IMPORTANT-DO NOT MISS this class! Read articles beforehand ! 
        Lecture: Behavior sampling and observation
        
        Discussion of: 
        a. Fragaszy et al. 1992. Behavior sampling in the field: 
        comparison of individual and group sampling methods. 
        American Journal of Primatology 26:259-275. 
        b. Altmann, J. 1974. Observational study of behaviour: sampling 
        methods. Behaviour 49:227-267. 
        
        February 7 
        Further discussion regarding behavior sampling, especially behavioral
        repertoires 
        
        Discussion of chapters: 
        a. Life Histories in Comparative Perspective, PS, pp 181-196 
        b. The Evolution of Life Histories, BE, pp.32-65 (portions ) 
        c. Food Distribution and Foraging Behavior, PS, pp.197-209 
        
        February 14 
        Discussion of: 
        a. Interactions among Primate Species, PS, pp. 210-226 
        b. Dispersal and Philopatry, PS, pp. 250-266 
        c. Interactions and Relationships between Groups, PS, pp. 267-281
        
        February 21 
        Discussion of 
        a. Evolution of social structure, PS, pp. 282-296 
        b. Predation, P S, pp. 227-240 
        c . Mitchell et al. 1991. Competitive regimes and female bonding 
        in two species of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi and S. 
        sciureus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 25:55-60. 
        
        d. J.A.R.A.M. van Hoof and C. P. van Schaik. 1992. Cooperation in 
        competition: the ecology of primate bonds. In: COALITIONS AND ALLIANCES
        IN HUMANS AND OTHER ANIMALS, ed. by Harcourt & de Waal. 
        
        
        February 28 
        a. Presentation (5 min each) of behavior projects. 
        b. Reports of behavior projects due. 
        c. Social Behavior in Evolutionary Perspective, PS, pp. 318-329 
        d. Mating systems, B E, pp. 263-299. 
        
        March 7 - Spring Break - Work on term papers ! 
        
        March 14 
        The outline and the core citation list of the term paper 
        are due. 
        
        The Ontogeny and Differentiation of Behavior 
        a. Infants, Mothers, and Other Females, pp.330-343 
        b. Infants and Adult Males, 343-357 
        c. Transition to Adulthood, pp.358-369 
        d. Boinski & Fragaszy. 1989. The ontogeny of foraging in squirrel
        monkeys. Animal Behaviour 37:415-428. 
        
        March 28 This week's topic is open. We will discuss our options. 
        Perhaps we should divide up the material assigned for Sexual 
        Behavior on April 4. QUIZ 
        
        April 4 Sexual Behavior 
        a. Patterning of Sexual Activity, PS, pp. 370-384 
        b. Sexual Competition and Mate Choice, PS, pp. 385--399 
        c. Gender, Aggression, and Influence, PS, pp. 400-412 
        d. Sexual Selection, B E, pp. 203-233. 
        
        Declaration of final title of each student's presentation based on term
        paper. Date and time of each student' s presentation will be
        determined. 
        
        Friday, April 7 - Last day that drafts of term papers can be submitted
        for comment. Deadline is noon in either 1350 or B366 Turlington. 
        
        April 11 The Captive Environment: Implications for Research and 
        Environmental Enrichment - Readings to be determined. 
        
        April 18 and 25 Student presentations and discussion thereof.
        The format of these sessions is based on that typical of professional
        meetings, a 12 minute-long oral presentation followed by a three minute
        long period for questions and comments. Refreshments will be served 
        during intermissions and the public will be invited. 
        
        Friday, April 28 
        TERM PAPERS MUST BE SUBMITTED by noon either in 1350 or B366
        Turlington. NO term papers will be accepted after this deadline (This
        is for your own good.). Please note that brownie points will be awarded
        generously for early submission of term papers. 
        
        Particularly pertinent journals for this course: 
        Animal Behaviour 
        American Journal of Primatology 
        American Journal of Physical Anthropology 
        Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 
        Behaviour 
        Ethology 
        Folia Primatologica 
        
        Reserve Materials: The following texts have been placed on reserve (2
        hr/overnight) at the Science Library. As a courtesy to other students
        in this class, please to do not monopolize primate texts that are not
        on reserve. 
        
        In any case, initiate and complete research for the term paper early! 
        
        1. QL737.P9 N322 NAPIER, JR 
        THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PRIMATES 
        
        2. QL737.P9 J64 1985 JOLLY, A 
        EVOLUTION OF PRIMATE BEHAVIOR
        
        3. QL737.P9 C577 VOLS. 1, 2A,2B,3,4 SWINDLER ET AL. 
        COMPARATIVE PRIMATE BIOLOGY 
        
        4. QL737.P9 W64 1988 WOLFHEIM, J 
        PRIMATES OF THE WORLD: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND CONSERVATION 
        
        5. 412.3 P952 CLUTTON-BROCK, TH 
        PRIMATE ECOLOGY: STUDES OF FEEDING AND RANGING BEHAVIOUR 
        
        6. QL737.P9 P674 HINDE 
        PRIMATE SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH
        
        7. QL737.P9 H245 HARAWAY, DJ 
        PRIMATE VISIONS: GENDER, RACE, AND NATURE IN THE WORLD OF MODERN SCENCE
        
        8. QL 737.P9 R54 RICHARD,AF 
        PRIMATES IN NATURE
        
        9. QL737.P9 A35 1984 CANT, J ET AL. 
        ADAPTATIONS FOR FORAGING IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES 
        
        10. QL737.P9 M54 MITCHELL, G 
        BEHAVIORAL SEX DIFFERENCES IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES 
        
        11. QL737.P9 U78 1992 HARCOURT & DE WAAL 
        COALITIONS AND ALLIANCES IN HUMANS AND OTHER ANIMALS 
        
        12. QL737.P9 E26 1988 FA 
        ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR OF FOOD-ENHANCED PRIMATE GROUPS 
        
        13. QL737.P9 F39 1984 SMALL 
        FEMALE PRIMATES: STUDIES BY WOMEN PRIMATOLOGISTS
        
        14. QL737.P93 C44 1990 CHENEY AND SEYFARTH 
        HOW MONKEYS SEE THE WORLD: INSIDE THE MIND OF ANOTHER SPECES 
        
        15. QL737.P9 J88 1993 PEREIRA & FAIRBANKS 
        JUVENILE PRIMATES: LIFE HISTORY, DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOR
        
        16. QL737.P9 W28 1989 DE WAAL 
        PEACEMAKING AMONG PRIMATES 
        
        17. QL737.P9 B744 1984 BOX,HO 
        PRIMATE BEHAVIOUR AND SOCIAL ECOLOGY 
        
        18. QL737.F35 1982 FEDIGAN, L 
        PRIMATE PARADIGMS 
        
        19. QL758.5 P77 1993 MENDOZA AND MASON 
        PRIMATE SOCIAL CONFLICT 
        
        20. QL737.P9 P73 1990 BOX,HO 
        PRIMATE RESPONSES TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE 
        
        21. (WEST) QL737.P9 M32 1990 MARTIN, RD 
        PRIMATE ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION 
        
        
        Primate Behavior: Program of Presentations 
        
        Turlington Rm 1321 
        
        Students, faculty, and friends are cordially invited to attend all or
        portions of the two sesssions of presentations by students in the
        Spring 1995 Primate Behavior seminar. The format of these sessions is
        based on those typical of professional meetings, a twelve minute-long
        oral presentation followed by a three minute-long period for 
        questions and comments. Note that each session includes a break during
        which refreshments will be served. Please come! 
        
        Tuesday, April 18th 
        
        8:45 - 9:00 Sophia Balcomb 
        What good are males anyway? Uni-male versus multi-male groups 
        
        9:00- 9:15 Susan Moegenberg 
        Play behavior in primates and other animals 
        
        9:15 - 9:30 Kathy Summers 
        Female mate choice in primates: an evaluation of the good genes 
        hypothesis 
        
        9:30 - 9:45 Jennifer Wheeler 
        Weaning: factors underlying temporal variation in patterns 
        
        9:45-10:00 Refreshment Break 
        
        10:00 - 10:15 Tom Matthews 
        The ecology of polyspecific associations 
        
        10:15 - 10:30 David Killane 
        Primate dispersal: proximate and ultimate causes 
        
        10:30 - 10:45 Beth Hazel 
        Molecular phylogenies of primates 
        
        Tuesday, April 25th 
        
        8:45 - 9:00 Eric Jacobs 
        Operant models of group formation 
        
        9:00- 9:15 Cynthia Pietras 
        Conflict and cooperation: integrating field and lab analyses 
        
        9:15 - 9:30 Heather Walsh-Haney 
        Does tool use predict intellectual complexity? 
        
        9:30 - 9:45 Lisa Marriner 
        Behavioral and physiological correlates of Stress 
        
        9:45-10:00 Refreshment Break 
        
        10:00 - 10:15 Chris Hess 
        You got to stop and smell the primates 
        
        10:15 - 10:30 Marcy Berlow 
        Mother-infant relationships: costs and benefits 
        
        10:30 - 10:45 Michael McGinnes 
        Primate behavior and locomotion