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Primate Taxonomy

Page 64

64) One of the lesser apes, the white-handed gibbon of southeast Asia, is almost exclusively arboreal. Gibbons use the arm-over-arm swinging called brachiation to move through the trees. Notice the elongated arms seen in this mother and child. Arms that are longer than legs are characteristic of all the apes. Like the Old World monkeys, gibbons have callouses on their rear ends which allow them to sit comfortably in trees. The great apes and humans lack this feature. Mother gibbon holding an infant. Note relative lengths of arms and legs, and lack of tail.
Notes: Mother gibbon holding an infant. Note relative lengths of arms and legs, and lack of tail.
Scientific name: Hylobates lar
The text gives one characteristic that gibbons have in common with other apes (arm length) and one that they share with Old World monkeys (the sitting pads or callouses called ischial callosities).
Photo © by: Nancy Staley

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